Charles H. Bill, MD, Ph.D.

Board Certified: American Board of Neurological Surgery
Assistant Clinical Professor: Department of Surgery, Michigan State University College
of Human Medicine
Residency: University of Miami, 1992
Medical School: Michigan State University, College of Human Medicine, 1985
PhD, Anatomy: University of Kansas Medical Center, 1978
Undergraduate: Western Illinois University, 1973
 
Dr. Bill was inspired to become a doctor by the example of his grandfather, a physician and surgeon trained at Cook County Hospital in Chicago and awarded the Silver Cross by King George V for his service to England in the battlefield hospital in Givenchy, France during WWI. Before completing medical school, Dr. Bill earned his doctorate in anatomy and taught neuroanatomy at the University of Kansas, histology at the University of Michigan and endocrinology and human anatomy at Michigan State University. His research required microsurgery of the pituitary gland, which lead to his medical degree and neurosurgical specialty. Upon completion of his residency he was invited to join Lansing Neurosurgery. Dr. Bill enjoys the challenge of Neurosurgery and the opportunity to use all of his sub-specialty training. Although his expertise is in surgery, Dr . Bill enjoys working with patients in the many aspects of non-surgical medical care.
 
When not caring for patients, Dr. Bill teaches medical students, and residents in surgery, emergency medicine and neurology. He also lectures on diagnosis and management of head-injured patients.

Local MD's explain Glioblastoma, aggressive type of Brain Cancer

News of Senator John McCain’s cancer diagnosis shocked the world last week.
The former prisoner of war and Republican presidential nominee has an aggressive brain cancer called, Glioblastoma.
Glioblastoma, or more commonly known as GBM, is a type of brain cancer that doctors say is not only aggressive, but can spread quickly.
While Sen. McCain’s doctors say he’s exploring future treatment options, his diagnosis prompted 6-News to take a closer look at the type of brain cancer that affects thousands of Americans.